Herbs

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Bulk Herbs from Frontier

Annatto Seed:These small, reddish-brown seeds from the annatto tree are used to impart a rich yellow color and mild, distinctive flavor to foods such as rice and sauces.

Astragalus Root: Astragalus root comes from a perennial plant that is found across much of northern China and Mongolia. The herb is a staple of Traditional Chinese Medicine, where it has been used for centuries as a superior tonic.

Black Cohosh Root:Black Cohosh is a tall, handsome perennial herb, native to eastern North America, where it grows readily in a variety of woodland areas. Almost everything known about the value of black cohosh root, as described in the early American materia medica’s, came from practices and remedies of Native American peoples. Black cohosh was officially in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia from 1820 to 1936. Preparations containing black cohosh root are still one of the most popular herbs for women’s health in North America today.

Burdock Root: Burdock root is a popular folk remedy, and the fresh root is also a tasty vegetable. It is a superior tonic herb and alterative herb. Burdock has a special affinity for the skin and is used in all types of skin preparations. It also makes a pleasant tasting tea.

CatnipWell-loved by cats and prized by traditional European and American herbalists, this member of the mint family makes a pleasant herbal tea that is soothing to the tummy and is often used with children.

Chamomile FlowersFlavorful, comforting, gentle, traditional chamomile tea is made with German chamomile flowers. A versatile herb, chamomile is also an ingredient in shampoos and conditioners for light colored hair, in skin care creams and lotions, and in relaxing bath blends. 

Chaparral:Chaparral is an aromatic flowering bush found in the deserts of western North America and parts of Mexico. It is also known as creosote bush because it contains a sticky, resinous gum with a strong, distinctive aroma.

Chicory Root (Roasted): A hardy perennial best known for its association with coffee, it produces a more ‘roasted’ flavor, with no caffeine. Some coffees offer blends with up to 30% chicory, which cuts down on the caffeine content.

Comfrey Root:The long, pervasive roots are more potent than the leaves but have higher levels of a constituent toxic to the liver. Use only on unbroken skin.

Damiana LeafDamiana is a flowering shrub with aromatic leaves. A native of Mexico, Central America, and the Southwest, it has long been used to make lovers’ teas, flavored wines and cordials.

Dandelion Root:The root of the common dandelion, long prized by herbalists for its cleansing action, is also packed with essential vitamins and minerals. Almost every herbal tradition has noted it as a useful tonic for the liver and gallbladder.

Echinacea Purpurea Herb: Echinacea, commonly referred to as “coneflower” is a genus of nine different herbacious plants native to North America. The two primary species used in herbal preparations are E. Angustifolia and E. Purpurea, which are often used interchangeably.

Elderberries: Elderberries are dark purple fruits with a sweet-tart, fruity flavor. They make tasty, warming winter cordials, teas, syrups and wines. Elderberries contain bioflavonoids and vitamin C.

Eucalyptus Leaf: Eucalyptus is an evergreen tree native to Australia. The leaves contain eucalyptol, a common flavoring ingredient in commercial mouthwash, cough drops and vaporizer fluids.

Fenugreek Seed: Fenugreek seeds are rich in protein and in some cultures both the leaves and seeds are consumed as a food. As a seasoning, the seeds are used whole or ground in a variety of ethnic cuisines. Also known as Greek hay seed, or trigonella, fenugreek is a member of theLeguminosae, or pea and bean family. Fenugreek’s Latin name Foenum graecum, means Greek hay; the ancients used it for hay, as well as food and medicine.

Ginger Root (Dried): One of the many forms of ginger we have. This one is mostly used as a tea. 

Ginseng Root Powder: American ginseng was first used by Native Americans, but was “discovered” in 1715 by a Jesuit missionary in Canada. American ginseng is used like Asian ginseng, except that it’s considered more cooling and balancing (more yin).

Goldenseal Leaf: Goldenseal is a perennial North American native plant known for its ability to “enhance seasonal resistance.”* Due to its popularity and the loss of habitat, goldenseal is listed in various states as threatened or endangered. We sell only certified organic cultivated goldenseal.

Goldenseal Root: Goldenseal root has an earthy, bitter flavor and a bright yellow color.

Gotu Kola Herb: Gota kola, also known as Asiatic pennywort, is a small annual herb native to parts of Asia and northern Australia. A mild adaptogen, preparations of the dry herb are popular throughout the world. In its native land, however, it is eaten raw as an afternoon pick-me-up.

Hawthorn Berry Powder: Hawthorn Berries, also referred to as haws, have been used since the 19th century as a tonic.  Support for healthy heart function*

Hibiscus Flowers: Hibiscus, also known as rosemallow, is a flowering plant belonging to the same family as cocoa and cotton. The flowers are popular as an herbal tea, especially in Caribbean and Latin American countries. They are often combined with other herbs or fruit juices and they impart a cheery red color and tart flavor.

Horsetail Herb (Shavegrass): Horsetail is also known as scouring rush, shavegrass, bottlebrush or pewter wort. Because of its large quantity of silica, it was used to clean metal. Our horsetail consists of the sterile, aerial parts harvested in the summer months between June and August. Should not be used by persons with cardiac or renal dysfunction. Not recommended for long-term use or use by children. Do not exceed recommended dosage .

Juniper Berries: Juniper Berries are spicy, sweet, with a piney aroma. They are delicious in stews and soups and with meats (especially wild game). They also give gin its distinctive flavor and are a common flavor ingredient in bitters.

Lavender:The fresh, sweet aroma of lavender has relaxing and uplifting qualities that leave users with a sense of calm and balance, making it one of today’s most popular scents. Lavender is a gentle, multi-purpose herb.

Lemon Balm: Lemon balm is a sweet, lemony scented herb in the mint family that’s native to Europe and the Mediterranean region. Its subtle lemon flavor with mint and herb undertones makes it a popular relaxing tea.

Licorice root:Licorice is the root of a perennial herb native to Europe and Asia. Along with its popularity as a flavoring agent in foods and beverages, it has also been used to make coughs more productive and as a vitalizing herbal tonic.

Marshmallow root: Marshmallow root is valued for its soothing and protecting mucilage and is used in teas, syrups, poultices, ointments and lozenges.

Milk Thistle Seed: Milk thistle seed is used as a liver tonic, to “support healthy liver function*” and overall well being. The hard, dark-colored seeds are ground and used to make a tea or tincture, encapsulated, or added to foods. The whole seeds are also sometimes added to foods.

Mullein Leaf: The large, velvety leaves of the mullein plant make a soothing herbal tea. As an ingredient in salves and poultices, they have the same soothing effect on the skin.

Nettle: Stinging nettle is a perennial herb originating in Eurasia, but now naturalized over much of the world. Its many documented uses, from as far back as the Bronze Age, led to its seed being carried to numerous regions by settlers, where the plant soon escaped cultivation. The whole stinging nettle plant is valuable — leaves, seeds and roots. Its uses include food, traditional remedies, a fiber source, a dye plant and a rejuvenating spring tonic.

Oatstraw: Oats straw is the green top of the oat plant, harvested when the seed is at the milky stage, before it’s fully ripe. The herb is nutritive and soothing to itchy, flaky skin and is used in baths, lotions and skin washes. It also makes a comforting herbal tea.

Passion Flower: Passion Flower, also known as Maypop, is a climbing vine native to the Southern United States, where it has enjoyed a long history of use by Native Americans. Commonly taken as a tea, it has calming and soothing properties.

Pau d’Arco: Pau d’Arco is the inner bark of a tropical tree native to Central and South America. The tea brewed from this species is commonly referred to as Lapacho or Taheebo and contains lapachol, quercetin and flavonoids.

Peppermint: Peppermint is a hybrid of watermint and spearmint. Indigenous to Europe, it is now widely cultivated throughout the world. Sometimes referred to as “the world’s oldest medicine” it has been used for centuries to settle tummy upset and freshen breath.

Raspberry (Red Raspberry Leaf): Red raspberry leaf is used to make a tasty tea and is often combined with other tea herbs to give the beverages a more robust flavor. Raspberry contains tannins that give it an astringent flavor and make it a wonderful toning herb. Tannins are responsible for the astringency of raspberry leaves. Also present are several flavonoids and vitamin C.

Red Clover Blossoms:  Red Clover is a perennial native to Europe, Asia and Africa. It’s most recognizable use is as a fodder crop, however its phytoestrogen content has made it a popular supplement for women.

Rosehips: Rosehips, or rose haws, are the fruit of wild roses, also known as the “dog rose.”. They are a popular addition to a variety of herbal tea blends

Rose (Buds and Petals): Prized for it’s delicate beauty and intoxicating fragrance, rose buds and petals are a staple of potpouri blends and sachets.

Sage (White, Incense, Smudging): White Sage, also called incense sage, is native to the Southwestern United States and was revered as a sacred herb by Native Americans there. Branches of white sage are burned as incense, for purification, and in sweat baths. This sage is not used as a spice.

Sassafras Bark: An aromatic deciduous tree with leaves ranging in shape from three-lobed to unlobed. It is native to the United States.

Skullcap: Skullcap is an herb that grows uncultivated in the marshy lands of Canada, the northern and eastern parts of the United States, and southeast Asia. In China, the plant roots are known as huang quin, and employed to ease several conditions.

Shepherd’s Purse: Shepherd’s purse gets its name from the shape of the herb’s fruit, which resembles purses Europeans once hung from their belts. Shepherd’s purse can be found almost anywhere in the world. It has long believed to be an astringent agent.

Slippery Elm Bark: Slippery Elm is a small tree native to North America. The bark is harvested from the tree in the early spring and the outer bark is scraped off, leaving the mucilage-rich inner bark. The soothing mucilage is used in ointments, poultices, throat lozenges and skin care products.

Spearmint Leaf: A parent of peppermint and one of the oldest mints cultivated, spearmint is used to flavor all types of foods, such as jellies, jams, candies, sauces, desserts and fruit dishes. It is also used to flavor and fragrance toothpaste, mouthwash, lozenges and chewing gum. Spearmint makes a refreshing herbal tea and is delicious iced or hot.

St. John’s Wort: Saint John’s Wort, so-called because it is traditionally harvested on St. John’s Day, is a striking perennial herb indigenous to Europe. It is one of the most popular medicinal herbs in the United States with its primary use being to balance the mood.

Stevia Extract Powder (Now Foods Brand): Stevia, also known as sweetleaf or sugarleaf, is a member of the sunflower family and native to South and Central America.

Uva Ursi Leaf: Uva Ursi is a low growing evergreen native to North America, Asia and Europe. It is also commonly referred to as bearberry, because its bright red berries are a favorite of bears. It supports a healthy urinary tract.

Valerian Root: Valerian is well known for its strong, distinct aroma, which only develops after the roots are dried. One of the most calming and deeply relaxing herbs we know of, valerian is often used in bedtime formulas and sleep pillows.

Wormwood: Wormwood is one of the bitterest herbs known and provides the bitter flavor in vermouth. Its essential oil contains thujone as a major constituent; thujone is harmful in large amounts. Wormwood is used in closet and drawer sachets, as a bitter aromatic and as an ingredient in liniments.

Other Nutritional Foods and Supplements (Bulk/Powdered Forms) 

Afalfa Powder:Organic alfalfa leaf powder, for baths and other herbal body care and for encapsulation.

Beet Powder:Our beet powder is made from the red, fleshy root portion of the plant after the root hairs and green tops have been removed. One pound of beet powder re-hydrated is approximately equal to 9 pounds of fresh, unprepared beets.

Spinach Powder: The fresh, green flavor of spinach can be added to most savory recipes.  Also can be used as a natural food coloring.

Spirulina Powder: Our spirulina is cultivated, pond grown spirulina.

Kelp Powder

L- Glutamine Powder

Maca Powder, Red or Yellow

Psyllium Powder: Psyllium, also known as blonde psyllium, is a low growing herb native to Iran, Pakistan and India. It is the main ingredient in the commercial dietary supplements “Metamucil” and “Citrucel”.

 

Descriptions collected from Frontier Website.

* Disclaimer:
This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.